Beautiful Women, Cars, and Jokes. What else is there?
by The Keeper June 23, 2017

 

Here we go, once again it’s Friday and the weekend is upon us! Today I have some Cuban automotive goodness to share with all of you. You heard me right, one of my readers recently took a trip to Cuba and photographed many of the cars there. Of course, the majority of them are American cars from the 50s that have been Frankensteined together from a variety of donor parts. They’re still really cool to check out, so enjoy the Cuban goodness and the usual double babes & double jokes!

 

-keep

 

Keep, We just returned from a trip to three cities in Cuba, so I thought I’d send some pics of the famous cars on the island. Yes, they were everywhere, but they were all taxis; and a ride in one of these was more expensive than in another car. If they weren’t an older American car, chances are the car was an old Russian square car, but there were a few new Japanese cars around too. Our guide mentioned that Cuba doesn’t have car mechanics – they have magicians. None of these cars has the original engine – they were all whatever the mechanic (magician) could find – usually a four-cylinder import. Finally, the cars near the tourist zones looked immaculate with beautiful paint jobs. Away from the tourist zones, they were still around, but didn’t look so show-ready. I’ll send 47 pics through multiple emails – if you choose to post any, use whichever ones you wish. -Dave from Iowa

 

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by The Keeper June 22, 2017

 

I’m pretty sure this is why the slow-motion effect was invented…

 

-keep

 

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by The Keeper June 21, 2017

 

My interest in cars most likely started as a kid when I received my first toy car. I don’t remember if it was a Hot Wheels or a Matchbox, but however it started, it quickly expanded into a collection of both brands. As the collection continued to grow in size, it became harder and harder to store them. At first I used those nice plastic carrying cases that held each car in a slot of it’s own. However, my ever-expanding collection quickly outgrew them. My solution was to start putting them in metal boxes similar to tool boxes that we had laying around. At the time it seemed like a good idea, but over the years they slid around unsecured, impacting each other. The sad result was paint chips—and a lot of ’em! I tried to repair the damage with Testors model paint and a brush, but the results of my crude attempt were horrible.

 

These days restoring these 1:64th classics is a big deal. I recently came across the video featured above that details the correct way to go about the restoration process. I found it very interesting, informative, and strangely relaxing. It really makes me wish I hadn’t given away the majority of my old collection many years ago!

 

-keep

 

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